Jul 132011
 
2703181791_c891055e53_m
Colorful shorts

Size 0. Honest. Really.

Warning: If you’re sensitive to harsh language, industrial-grade criticism, defiant thought, or consumer truth-speaking, skip this post.

If you’re a clothing merchant, vendor or designer who supports deceptive labeling and vanity sizing, sit down. This is gonna hurt.

[ SMACK  • SMACK  •  SMACK ]

Just how stupid do they think we are?

Here’s why I’m p*ssed.

While searching for plus size apparel for my plus size clients, I keep colliding with merchants with anti-plus-size vanity sizing tactics.

Searching for 18W, 20W, 2X, XXL yields the expected results but excludes stores that carry many very desirable plus size fashions.

Why? Because they’re labeling their plus size apparel with vanity sizing. Labeling a 2X blouse as a Size 4. Calling an 18W dress a Womens Size 6. I’ll spare you the merchant names.

When I ask the merchants for clarification, I am presented with attitudes like:

  • We don’t want our brand associated with “plus size.”
  • Our customers don’t like to be referred to as “plus size.”
  • Just read the size chart.
  • Customers feel better when they can wear a smaller size.
  • It’s just like “plus size” but we call it something different.
  • We don’t need to actually call it “plus size” on our website.

Let’s break it down, shall we?

We don’t want our brand associated with “plus size.”

Because? More women might find and wear your clothes? You might make more money? Your product line might become more popular?  You offer plus size outfits for sale, only you mark them as Size 5, or Extended, or Womens? Who are you trying to kid?

 

Our customers don’t like to be referred to as “plus size.”

Do you honestly think that we plus size people don’t know we’re plus size?  We’re also Curvy. Curvaceous. Curvalicious. Junoesque. Rubenesque. Goddess. The list goes on. But again, who are you trying to kid – your clientele or yourselves? Your customers are smarter than that. Don’t point a fire hose at my face and try to tell me it’s sprinkling.

 

Just read the size chart.

Let’s be honest. Far too many size charts are printed in teensy tiny print. Finding the size chart link on some product pages is a nightmare. Found the size chart but it’s gonna take a fashion Rosetta Stone to make sense of it? Best of luck, sweetness.

 

Customers feel better when they can wear a smaller size.

Uhh. If you’re catering strictly to the delusional, sure. If a dress has a bust measurement of 46 inches, sewing in a label that says “Size 4″ does not magically make it a size 4 dress.

 

It’s just like “plus size” but we call it something different.

You can call your house cat a prize racehorse if you want, but getting it to place in the Kentucky Derby is going to be a real trick.

 

We don’t need to actually call it “plus size” on our website.

Rumors aside, Google and its ilk are not staffed by 4.2 million psychic operators standing by to respond to searches. So, when someone searches for “plus size dress,” the odds are MINISCULE** that Google is going to find a dress marked Size 0.

=============

The practice of vanity sizing and seasonal adjustment is by no means confined to merchants hoping to avoid the appearance of providing plus size apparel. Just check out this clothing size infographic from the New York Times, circa April 2011. There’s enough outrage for everybody of any size, plenty to go around.

[ SMACK • SMACK ]

** Miniscule… just like tiny but we call it something different.

How does vanity sizing and seasonal size changing make you feel? Speak out!

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.